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NULL + VOID   PODCAST + Q & A February 2016

 

WIRE MAGAZINE REVIEW (TRAFFIC, COMFORTZONE), David Keen, February 2016

 

A compilation of squawking, pattering, hissing numbers of friends and accomplices of Vienna’s ComfortZone label. Since 2009, the Austrian company has been publishing a progressive envelope of predominantly feminist and queer artists making experimental electronic music. This release brings together label founder Chra (aka Christina Nemec) with fellow Viennese like 3rynnia, plus international artists Shelley Parker, Moon Ra and Silvia Kastel. Dawn’s “Seven Seals” with dark crepuscular energy. Mo’s “Icetrain” on the other hand, originally released by Berlins Elektro Music Department back in 1998, beats out the same bar of insistent C sharp quaver beats for nearly eight minutes. Other highlights include Nemec’s very own minatory rumble “Blackbird” and Shelley Parker’s urgent mix of London street sounds, grime beats and hyperactive Casio tics.

 

JUNO REVIEW (TRAFFIC, COMFORTZONE) December 2015

 

TRAFFIC (COMFORTZONE) INCLUDED IN SASHA VAN DER SPEETEN’s SELECTION FOR  22TRACKS BRUSSELS December 2015

 

REVIEW TOWARDS COLLAPSE EVENT (STRAY LANDINGS) November 2015

 

STRAY LANDINGS PODCAST + Q & A October 2015

 

REVIEW GHOST IN THE MACHINE MUSIC EVENT  (FREQ) October 2015

 

REVIEW NEW LABOUR COMPILATION OPAL TAPES (ALKALINE) June 2015

 

VIDEO CLIP DJ set  TEST DEPT - TOTAL STATE MACHINE BOOK LAUNCH April 2015

 

RADIO BLACK FOREST  PODCAST + Q & A December 2014

BOOMKAT REVIEW  SHELLEY PARKER / SPURN POINT / STRUCTURE  September 2014

London-based sound artist/producer/DJ, Shelley Parker presents an inquisitive album of alien concrète structures compiled from edits and extracts of her performances / installations / videos over the last five years. 'Spurn' follows the aesthetic themes of her 'Sleeper Line' EP for Entr'acte in eight pieces that tease out and augment a latent sense of "techno" from industrial field recordings and documentation of her work, focussing on its rhythmic and spatial qualities. The results are best defined in terms of their physical bass presence and structured patterns, drawing analogs with both the canonical minimalism of Steve Reich, Philip Glass or La Monte Young, and the dynamics of early '90s dance music, from D&B's angular anarchitextures to the stark constructions of Pan Sonic. In doing so, she gives the inanimate physical world a sort of emotive voice, one which it's possible to understand thru the repetition of its raw gesture and frictional inference amplified and given clearer diction by Shelley's electronic EQ'ing.

VIDEO LIVE SET  FLUSSI FESTIVAL, ITALY (URSSS) August 2014

INTERVIEW  FEMME CULT WOMEN IN ELECTRONICA  August 2014

YEAH I KNOW IT SUCKS  ASPHALT / IUGERI SONUS IV COMPILATION / ACRE RECORDINGS July 2014

Shelley Parker kicks a slow but determined beat to inform us that a track called ‘Asphalt’ has arrived. This artist also goes for the great combination of noise and rhythm. Perhaps this is the stuff that will soon replace all the dubstep fluff, although I seriously hope not. This kind of stuff should be heard in the darkness, in the alternative zones where no hipster can come in without being sacrificed to Satan. But let’s focus on the track by Shelley Parker as it is rather bombastic and cool. It’s like a electronic enactment of a gigantic mechanic sounding dinosaur that steps around solidly, making the earth move and providing a great dark beat along the way.

WIRE MAGAZINE  REWIND CONTRIBUTORS CHARTS: JOSEPH STANNARD (SLEEPER LINE EP / ENTR’ACTE) January 2014

FACT MAGAZINE NIC BULLEN’S FAVOURITE RELEASES OF 2013 (SLEEPER LINE EP / ENTR’ACTE) December 2013

ARTS DESK  ELECTRO VISCERAL ANTHRO INTENSITY / AMERSHAM ARMS / Joe Muggs, September 2013

WIRE MAGAZINE  SHELLEY PARKER / SLEEPER LINE EP / ENTR’ACTE / Rory Gibb, September 2013

Shelley Parker’s Sleeper Line uses sound sources near to hand, in this case location recordings made at various places and dates, from Dungeness Power Station in 2012 to the cloakroom at London’s Metalheadz club in 1997. They’re woven among near subsonic booms that billow like underwater depth charges. The connection to Metalheadz in particular feels appropriate — the way low-end interference triggers all the material within Parker’s tracks to vibrate in unison beautifully mirrors the sensation of being sat backstage in a peaktime club, where kickdrums blasting through the walls cause everything not nailed down to rattle in synchrony with the music.

JUST OUTSIDE  SHELLEY PARKER / SLEEPER LINE EP / ENTR’ACTE / Brian Olewnick, August 2013

Here’s an example of a disc whose music lies well outside of my normal parameters but which I nonetheless find absorbing and highly enjoyable. Parker creates five tracks on this EP, each of which dwelling in a beat-laden atmosphere, but one in which the pulses are very slow, somewhere less than 60bpm, sometimes much less, usually imbued with both massive bass underpinnings and a sizzle of irregular grime atop. The slowed tempo and the elements chosen combine to form a luscious, lava-like flow, forming an endless stream of surges that encrust, break, encrust, break, iterating but accreting variances as they go. There are doubtless more appropriate references but if you imagine some of [Bill] Laswell’s dark ambient ’90s work and then up the quality level three or fourfold, you'll be in the vicinity. An odd combination of rich and desolate — I like it a lot,can only imagine hearing it live, worrying about dislodging embolisms... Great stuff.

FABRIC TOP 10 SLEEPER LINE EP / ENTR’ACTE July 2013

YEAH I KNOW IT SUCKS  ANVIL / IUGERI SONUS III COMPILATION / ACRE RECORDINGS July 2013

Shelley Parker wears a pair of steel sounding beats and seems to be exploring some kind of mouldy basement. Parker slaps the bats away with a handy piece of wood, while almost falling over the wires of an old washing machine. Where is the light switch when you need one? Soon all the basement sounds are forming some kind of danceable track that luckily doesn’t evolve in a musical factory where Bjork starts to dance around with a broom among others like the movie where she was gracefully hanged ‘Dancer in the dark.’ Perhaps in the basement of Shelley Parker wasn’t enough room to bring in the violin section, the ballerina’s and trombones, but it is definitely aimed like the movie title to be something that feels like dancing in the darkness of a basement.

FACT MAGAZINE  BEST ALBUMS JAN - JUNE 2013 (SLEEPER LINE EP / ENTR’ACTE)

FACT MAGAZINE  SHELLEY PARKER / SLEEPER LINE EP / ENTR’ACTE / Steve Shaw, June 2013

Continue reading if you like Raime, Carter Tutti Void, Demdike Stare, and similar: Shelley Parker’s latest EP has arrived on the inimitable and always fascinating Entr’acte. Focusing on pulse-based musique concrete, and informed by interests in dance music and noise, Sleeper Line is an exploration of quiet industrialism, delivered at a glacial pace. It also has an intriguing concept that holds its elements together, its press release stating that ‘[the] components – manipulated found sounds – were recorded at various times and in various environments: Dungeness Power Station (2012), street recordings post-Notting Hill Carnival (2007), a prior live performance at the White Building in London (2012), and a cassette recording made in the cloakroom of the Metalheadz Sunday Sessions club night (1997).’

It is surprising how much this comes through, a palpable feeling of something happening behind the scenes, and a definite feeling of live performance. The EP could, in fact, be regarded as an excellent example of the final result being far more than simply the sum of its parts. Although the samples will have been honed with great attention, Parker’s instrumentation is actually quite simple; a myriad of feedback-like gestures and textures, often joined by purer high and sub-register sine tones and fragments of the original recordings, left unchanged as acousmatic objects. It’s a palette that will be familiar to anyone with even a passing interest in industrial or noise music, and that’s without even mentioning the record’s underpinning leitmotif  – samples as variations on a long-tailed 909 kick, used in every track to mark the beginning of a bar like a knell, be it harsh and in the fore, or submerged and at a distance.

However, unlike many of her contemporaries, Parker’s discipline is more comparable to that of a sound artist than a musician. With a refreshing absence of drones and freeform abstract parts, Sleeper Line’s five tracks dwell solely on gradually stacking layers and taking them away in simple but effective combinations – something I could imagine a contemporary classical percussionist working with sound doing. Parker funnels her source material into rotational structures at an ominously slow 65bpm. Phrases are one or two bars in length, with parts emerging gradually from and receding into nothing. Detail comes from small changes, voices varying in duration and timbre, parts dropped out to create space, added in to create momentum. A gradual, ebbing and flowing form is used to focus in on these layers and their interactions, all elements merging into a revolving, doom-laden architectural breathing. With all tracks flowing into each other effortlessly, new material growing consistently from each point reached by the end of the previous set, the EP is refreshingly engrossing, best experienced from start to finish. Parker’s methodical approach to structure of sound is both old school and welcome, with Sleeper Line a short, tense tour around some kind of sleeping giant.

HYDROACOUSTICS curated by Jake Williams and produced by Jake Williams & Tamar Shlaim, May 2013. (Video by Ali Wade)

HYDROACOUSTICS was a one-off day and night of cutting-edge site-specific electronic music, AV performances and installations aboard the MS Stubnitz – a decommissioned East German fishing vessel turned music and arts venue, that was moored temporarily at Canary Wharf, on May 6th 2013. Artists were asked to step outside their usual styles and create new projects for this one-off event in this unique space.

The programme featured an extremely rare live performance from seminal, secretive electronic post-industrialists :zoviet*france:, a new collaborative live work from Scottish techno artists Patrick Walker (Forward Strategy Group) and Ruaridh Law (TVO) based on an imagined history of the boat, a very special commissioned installation/performance ‘Microclimate II’ from noise don Roly Porter (ex-Vex’d) and visual artist Rod Maclachlan, a live performance from experimental soundscape artist Helm aka Luke Younger (PAN Records), an exceptionally powerful live set from Shelley Parker that was made entirely from samples of the boat itself and Paul Prudence’s performance of his AV work ‘Hydroacoustic Study’. Emmanuel Spinelli also presented ‘Aquarium’ – an installation / performance device in which field recordings of water in its many forms (ocean waves, rain, bubbles, droplets, tidal rhythms, ice, etc…) are triggered and manipulated through the touch of water inside a fish tank.

PERSONATONES  INTERVIEW March 2013

WIRE MAGAZINE / SEBASTIAN ELIKOWSKI-WINKLER / ENSEMBLE ADAPTER / BIS ALS LETZER DER ZEUGEN DAS GEDACHTNIS VERSTUMMT / SHELLEY PARKER REMIX / ENTR'ACTE

Nice single featuring a Berlin based quintet playing a piece by this German composer, with a remix on the flip. The piece itself has a nice aleatory feel, with twisting Berio-esque tonalities. The remix by UK sound artist Shelley Parker is quite radical, using small bits of the original to create a completely new composition. Which is what the whole remix thing is supposed to be about, right?

Byron Coley, December 2012

RECORD COLLECTOR / SEBASTIAN ELIKOWSKI-WINKLER / ENSEMBLE ADAPTER / BIS ALS LETZER DER ZEUGEN DAS GEDACHTNIS VERSTUMMT / SHELLEY PARKER REMIX / ENTR'ACTE

Composer Elikowski-Winkler's score allows the Berlin-based Ensemble Adapter to reel out a raft of extended techniques in serving the last rites on reductionism. Meanwhile, Morton Feldman's ghost roams about misting up the Klinker Club's windows from the outside with his cigar exhaust, as improvised parp and chatter resound like John Cage passing a treadmill through the shell of a fortune cookie. On the flip, Shelley Parker coats the piece in a supernatural sheen, while chucking a few extra rashers in the sizzling saucepan on Graham Lambkin's disconcerting hob.

Spencer Grady, December  2012

RESONANCE FM  ABJECT BLOC / INTERVIEW + LIVE SET October 2012

NTS RADIO  FRACTAL MEAT ON A SPONGY BONE / GRAHAM DUNNING / INTERVIEW July 2012

BOOMKAT REVIEW  SHELLEY PARKER / CD COMPILATION / STRUCTURE March 2011

London-based DJ/Photographer/AV artist Shelley Parker presents a compilation of 11 dark, minimal and experimental electronic tracks from Scanone, Kansas City Prophets, Cursor Miner, Filter Feeder and herself as the first release on her Structure imprint.The set opens to the sharp contrasts of oily black subbass and teeth-gritting noise on Structure's 'Zero Point Energy', before a Breaks-y charge from Kansas City Prophets 'Drome' and the sci-fi scape electro of Scanone's '1002' and his spiky remix of Shelley's 'Nintendo Love'. Sound design expert Cursor Miner provides two of the biggest highlights on the elaborate electro-acoustic arrangement of 'The Rite Of Wrong' and the harrowing 'There Was A Boy',while Shelley's own 'Masquerade' stands out for its robust mechanical syncopations and Filter Feeder stretch out into two abstract Techno vortices.

WIRE MAGAZINE / FILTER FEEDER / SHOPPING / SHELLEY PARKER REMIX / ENTR’ACTE / Nick Richardson, February 2011

Shopping is elusive composer Julian Doyle’s canto to honour the loop. On each of the tracks here, Doyle works up short, bar-long cells of chirping synth and analogue percussion, passes them through a simple chain of filters and lets them ride. Loops are like drones: get them right and you’ve got a rich sonic environment that focuses the listener on tiny changes in texture. The key, Doyle suggests, is rhythm: put the bar line where the ear least expects it and your loop will keep morphing, or seeming to, without you needing to lift a finger.On the B side, DJ Shelley Parker gives Doyle a sullen, dubbed-out remix: the loops are screwed to a sizzurp crawl, the synths are voided of pitch, reduced to Pole-style percussive crackle and moored in cavernous bass.

POSTHUMAN / HILDA FAMILY REMIXED / MYUZYK 2008

(THE WEE DJ’S / TVO / SHELLEY PARKER / DIGITIONAL / DUKE SPOOK / DAVE GRAHAM / JAMES FOX / LJ KRUZER / SOL DAT / KELP / J HAZEN)

Myuzyk marks its first physical release with an album of remixes from Posthuman. Stemming from a download only album a wide range of artists have stepped up, and combined have created an album of electronica bliss. Each of the remixers takes their favourite track from this album add their own unique style to it. James Fox’s version of ‘Asha Grew Wings’ grabs my attention with the metronomic sub bass throughout and the sparse beats and warm pads. Walter Becomes Wendy (another alias of Posthuman) remixes ‘Fortune Favours The Foolish’ stand out too as they progress through the tune with a great hypnotic bassline and edgy beats. LJ Kruzer adds an ambient version of ‘Asha Grew Wings’ which is worlds apart from James Fox’s version. The Village Orchestra also remix this which will appeal to fans of James Holden and Border Community Records. Electro boys The Wee djs add their imitable style to ‘Fortune Favours The Foolish’ that has plump stuttering beats combined with high pitched  strings. Sol_dat adds his industrial old school breaks come electro spell to ‘Asha Grew Wings’ next whilst Kelp (not the DC one I suspect) gives ‘The Disease’ a pounding warehouse techno feel. London producer and dj Shelley Parker offers her version of this next and proves that girls like bass with this held back shuddering bass dubstep come electronica clicked out version. J Hazen comes over all electronica/ pop on ‘Lust Of Dust’ which leads nicely to the soothing strings and acid laden Digitonal version of ‘Asha Grew Wings.’

Rik Haines (Bloc / Hyponik / Glade Festival)

POSTHUMAN / HILDA FAMILY REMIXED / THE DISEASE / SHELLEY PARKER REMIX / MYUZYK 2008

The first sensations that spring to mind concern space, texture, systems, mathematics, building blocks, structure rather than melody or rhythm - space within the music, space as a particular landscape that the mix conjures up. Top work, the highlight from an excellent mix package.

Richard Norris (Beyond The Wizard's Sleeve / The Time and Space Machine)

CREATIVE REVIEW  MAGAZINE  SUBWAY SECT ON RESONANCE FM: DOUGAL WILSON & SHELLEY PARKER IN CONVERSATION, December 2007

TIME OUT MAGAZINE / Chloe Lola, May 2006

Electro is a genre with the power and heart to withstand the vagaries of fashion. A musical diamond with many facets, it’s long been the essential element for the Haywire collective, which turned ten last year. Showing no signs of slowing down, they’re back for a residency at the T Bar, with rising star Shelley Parker as resident. Parker, fresh from studio collaborations with electro mainstays Transparent Sound, and all set for an appearance at the Encompass festival in May, explains: ‘This night aims to be diverse. It’s about mixing minimal sounds with tracks that have a more twisted edge, but not going into dark territory every time! There’s a real crossover happening with labels releasing tracks that mix electro and 4/4.’ T Bar, now established as the place for both after-work and after-party crowds, was their first choice because, as Parker says, ‘it’s great to be able to play electro-techno-bass at a venue where people aren’t usually hearing such bass-driven sounds.’ Haywire’s Amanda Burton agrees: ‘T Bar is a fantastic space; we’ve worked together on some pretty lively parties and now with our monthly residency, we’ll be adding a live element.’ Just one look at their roster of guests bears this out; many are Haywire artists, but what really links them is that they’re all resoundingly different. Radioactive Man played at the launch, while none other than Richard Fearless – making a rare UK appearance - joins Parker this Thursday, with Magda forthcoming. As a monthly electro fix that’s also free, Haywire Sessions is sure to find common ground with many others.

DJ MAGAZINE / GOTTA BE BIG / Claire Hughes, June 2005

Techno-electro DJ Shelley Parker is this fortnight’s pick for deck-stardom.        

WHO? London-based techno/electro DJ who’s the only gal playing that music well in the UK at the moment. In Berlin this scene is dominated by the ladies, but here Shelley’s trail-blazing. WHAT? She plays lots of different styles but predominantly minimal groovy bass-heavy electro, in a style, we think, comparable to Andrew Weatherall and Keith Tenniswood.  WHERE? She’s resident at London club Nerd, plays at Haywire parties all over London and is just starting to guest across the UK. If she hasn’t hit your town yet, she will soon. WHEN? DJmag has spotted her recently at the Haywire parties in London. And when she plays the floor’s always full and frantic. WHY? Combining a bass-heavy techno/electro sound with a deep groove isn’t easy. Shelley does it well and we love her for it. Andrew Weatherall hand-picked Shelley to be on the Haywire roster and if you hear her DJ you’ll see why too. We’re already convinced.

TIME OUT MAGAZINE / GIRLS DON’T CLASH / Simone Baird, May 2004

Shelley Parker got the kind of break that inspires bedroom DJs who wannabe. After just two years of DJing, her residency at Nerd, which closed last Summer, attracted the attention of one Andy Weatherall. “He used to come down every so often. I used to play a lot of his things on his label, and it went from there. He used to come down really early, it was really sweet, I didn’t realise the importance of it at the time, but I think that he put a word in ...”  The ‘endorsement’ of Haywire resulted in more gigs. This week she returns to Being Boiled at the Notting Hill Arts Club, and plays under the Haywire banner in Fabric’s room two. Shelley’s the first to laugh at the sub-genres that have sprung out of a need to differentiate this kind of electro from that. “It is so weird that there are all these terms,” she says “ but I wanted to get away from what other people are playing. This is going to sound totally pretentious, but coming from an art school background, you get used to continually justifying and explaining yourself, questioning what you’re doing and how you’re going to develop”. Those going along hoping to hear, say, early Madonna mixed in with Soft Cell will be disappointed. “I like quite hard sounds, the stuff that comes from old school electro and some old drum & bass sounds … so I like things that are really noisy and messy. At art school I used to experiment with found sound, just recording noise. I’m interested in bringing together bass and noise that people can still dance to,” Shelley explains, “When I say I like hard electro, I mean the minimal sounds, Miami bass , quite Detroit and male, I suppose. Stuff that isn’t so flamboyant and disco!”